Click on the Homework Due Date Below:

 

Sept 24    Oct 1    Oct 8    Oct 15    Oct 22    Oct 29    Nov 5    Nov 12   

 

Nov 19    Nov 26    Dec 3    Dec 10

 

Last Day to Hand in Homework in Class = Wed Dec 10

 

Last Day to Email Homework to Prof. Tramo = Mon Jan 12

 

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Homework Due Sept 24

 

Reading

1. Tramo MJ.  Music of the hemispheres. Science 2001;

2. Tramo MJ. Brain and Music. In Randel DM (Ed), Harvard Dictionary of Music, 4th Ed., 2003, Harvard U Press, Cambridge.

3.  Rossing et al, Science of Sound 3rd Ed, 2002, Chapter 3, "Waves"

 

Problem Set

1. Rossing Chapter 3, Review Questions #1, 3, 6, 7, 8

 

Self-Teaching Exercise: Surface Anatomy of the Cerebral Cortex

1.  Search Google Images for pictures of the brain that identify surface structures -     

            i.e., gyri, sulci, lobes; share URLs with class

 

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Homework Due Oct 1

 

Reading

1.  Rossing et al, Science of Sound, 3rd Ed, 2002, Chapter 7, "Pitch and Timbre"

 

Problem Set

1. Rossing Chapter 7, Review Questions #2, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 15; Exercise #2

 

Self-Teaching Exercise: Digital Sound Recording & Speech Analysis

1. Using freeware available on the web (e.g., Amadeus, Audacity, Praat), record yourself saying a vowel, syllable, word, or short sentence.  Look at the acoustic waveform. Analyze all or part of what you said using the built-in tool that turns the waveform into a spectrogram.  Make sure you understand what the axes are on the waveform and spectrogram.  Now say what you said in a higher-pitched voice. Try a lower-pitched voice. Try a softer voice, then a louder voice.  How about a whisper?  How do all these waveforms differ?  How do the corresponding spectrograms differ?  What are the similarities?  Be prepared to discuss all of the above in class.  (No need to write down any answers.)

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Homework Due Oct 8

For Study Section A, due by the last day of Reading Period

 

Reading

1. Seminar:

            Frequency Processing & Pitch Perception

         Psychophysics & Functional Neuroanatomy

            i. Evarts EV.  Effect of auditory cortex ablation on frequency discrimination in monkey. J Neurophysiology 1952; 15:443-448

               - Presented by Rebekah Meyer

            ii. Zatorre RJ.  Pitch perception of complex tones and human temporal lobe function. J Acoustical Society of America 1988; 84:566-572

               - Presented by Catherine Glennon

            iii. Tramo MJ, Shah GD, Braida LD.  Functional role of auditory cortex in frequency processing and pitch perception. J Neurophysiology 2002; 87:122-139

              Microanatomy & Neural Coding

            iv.  Morel A, Garraghty PE, Kaas JH. Tonotopic organization, architectonic fields, and connections of auditory cortex in macaque monkeys. J Comparative Neurology 1993; 335: 437–459.

            v. Phillips DP, Semple MN, Calford MB, Kitzes LM. Level-dependent representation of stimulus frequency in cat primary auditory cortex. Experimental Brain Research 1994 102:210-226.

2. Rossing et al, Science of Sound 3rd Ed, 2002, Chapter 4, "Resonance"

 

Problem Set

1. Rossing et al, Chapter 4, Review Questions #1, 2, 4, 6, 8; Exercise #1

 

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Homework Due Oct 15

Except Study Section A members presenting papers

 

Reading

1. Seminar:

            Frequency Processing & Pitch Perception (cont'd)

         Psychophysics & Functional Neuroanatomy (cont'd)

            i. Tramo MJ, Shah GD, Braida LD.  Functional role of auditory cortex in frequency processing and pitch perception. J Neurophysiology 2002; 87:122-139

            - Presented by Michael Lin

              Microanatomy & Neural Coding - Presented by Ashley Fry & Kate Xie

            ii.  Morel A, Garraghty PE, Kaas JH. Tonotopic organization, architectonic fields, and connections of auditory cortex in macaque monkeys. J Comparative Neurology 1993; 335: 437–459.

            iii. Phillips DP, Semple MN, Calford MB, Kitzes LM. Level-dependent representation of stimulus frequency in cat primary auditory cortex. Experimental Brain Research 1994 102:210-226.

            iv. Bendor D, Wang X  The neuronal representation of pitch in primate auditory cortex. Nature 2005; 436:1161-1165. 

            Note: The entire class will present the Methods and Results of the Bendor & Wang paper, save Study Section A; I will prepare the slides.

 

Problem Set

1. There are two types of "Tuning Curves" - one is called an Isorate Function, the other an Isointensity Function.

            a. What is on the X axis of an Isointensity Function?

            c. What are the units of X? 

            d. What is on its Y axis?

            e. What are the units of Y? 

            f.  What type(s) of tone is used?

            g. What acoustic feature(s) of the tones are you going to vary when you test for neuronal frequency-selectivity using an Isointensity Function?

            h.  What acoustic feature(s) of the tone(s) are you going to keep constant when you test for neuronal frequency-selectivity using an Isointensity Function?

            i. Draw what you would expect to see for a neuron finely-tuned to a pure-tone with frequency = A5, loudness = pianissimo, and duration = 1/16th note, 4/4 meter, tempo 120 beats/min.  When you label Xmin and Xmax along the X axis, assume we are recording from a human (you can see Chap 5 in Rossing if you're not sure of the values, though I've mentioned this several times in class).  Label and define BF and FRA (abbreviation for the "frequency response area"; do this for all your functions.) Make sure the width of FRA compared to the distance from Xmin to Xmax is more or less realistic.

            j. Using a different color, draw what you would expect for the same neuron for the same pure tone with the same acoustic features except loudness = fortissimo.

            k. Using a third color, draw what you would expect for a different neuron that belongs to the "diffuse" a.k.a. "lemniscal adjunct" ascending auditory  pathway for a pure-tone with frequency = A5, loudness = pianissimo, and duration = 1/16th note, 4/4 meter, tempo 120 beats/min.

            l.  Now for the latter neuron, but frequency = A5, loudness = fortissimo, and duration = 1/16th note, 4/4 meter, tempo 120 beats/min.

       

2. For an Isorate Function:

            a. What is on the X axis?

            b. What are the units of X?                    

            c. What is on the Y axis?

            d. What are the units of Y?

            e. What is plotted?

      

3.  Looking at a more raw form of neural data:

            a. What is a Spike Raster (a.k.a. Dot Raster)?

            b. What is on the X axis?

            c. What are typical units of X? 

            d. What is on the Y axis?

            e. What are the units of Y? 

            f. What is plotted?

            g. Why is this more raw than an Isointensity or Isorate Function?

 

 

 

Homework Due Oct 22

Except Study Section B

 

Reading

1. Seminar:

            Harmony Perception in the Vertical Dimension

         Psychophysics

            i. Plomp R, Levelt WJM  Tonal consonance and critical bandwidth. J Acoustical Society of America 1965; 38: pp 552-555 pertaining only to "II. Experiments."

            ii. DeWitt LA, Crowder RG Tonal fusion of consonant musical intervals: The oomph in Stumpf. Perception & Psychophysics 1987; 41: 73-84

            Functional Neuroanatomy

            iii. Tramo MJ, Bharucha JJ  Musical priming post-callosotomy. Neuropsychologia 1991; 38: 548-560. Methods & Results pertaining only to Experiment 2

            Neural Coding

            iv. Tramo MJ, Cariani PA, Delgutte BD Neural correlates of the consonance of musical intervals: Multiscale temporal codes in the auditory nerve (in press)

2.  Rossing et al, Science of Sound 3rd Ed, 2002, Chapter 8, "Combination Tones & Harmony"

 

Problem Set

1. Rossing Chapter 8, Review Questions #4, 6, 10, 11; Questions for Thought & Discussion #2; Exercises #1, 2

 

 

 

 

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Homework Due Oct 29nd

Except Study Section C

 

Reading

1. Seminar: Harmony Perception in the Horizontal Dimension

         Cognitive Psychology

            i. Bigand E, et al. Sensory versus cognitive components in harmonic priming. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 2003: 159-171. (PDF in Institute eLibrary)

            Functional Neuroanatomy

            ii. Tramo MJ, Bharucha JJ  Musical priming post-callosotomy. Neuropsychologia 1991; 38: 548-560. Methods & Results pertaining only to Experiment 1 (PDF emailed last week)

           iii. Tillmann B, et al. Activation of the inferior frontal cortex in musical priming. Cognitive Brain Research 2003, 16: 145-161. (PDF in Institute eLibrary)

            Gross Electrophysiology (Event-related potentials)

            iv. Maess B, et al. Musical syntax is processed in Broca's area: An MEG study. Nature Neuroscience 2001; 4: 540-545 (PDF in Institute eLibrary)

           v. Poulin-Chardonnat B, et al. Processing of musical syntax tonic versuss ubdominant: An event-related potential study. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 200518:1545-1554. (PDF will be emailed)

 

2.  Rossing

Chapter 9, "Musical Scales & Temperament"

 

Problem Set

Rossing

Chapter 9, Review Questions #2, 17; Exercises #1, 6

 

Self-Teaching Exercise: Gross Anatomy of the Cerebral Cortex

1. On a separate sheet of paper, draw an outline of the right cerebral hemisphere. Inside the outline, draw and label the following (only):

a) the lateral fissure (a.k.a. the Sylvian fissure);

b) the central fissure (a.k.a. the Rolandic fissure); and

c) the superior temporal gyrus.

 

2. Lightly color in the anterior half of the STG; leave the posterior half unshaded.

 

3. Where is the transverse gyrus of Heschl? Can it be seen from a lateral view? If not, why not?

 

 

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  Homework Due Nov. 5

  Except Study Section D

 

Reading

1. Seminar: Harmony Perception in the Horizontal Dimension

         Cognitive Psychology

            i. Bigand E, et al. Sensory versus cognitive components in harmonic priming. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 2003: 159-171. (PDF in Institute eLibrary)

            Functional Neuroanatomy

            ii. Tramo MJ, Bharucha JJ  Musical priming post-callosotomy. Neuropsychologia 1991; 38: 548-560. Methods & Results pertaining only to Experiment 1 (PDF emailed last week)

           iii. Tillmann B, et al. Activation of the inferior frontal cortex in musical priming. Cognitive Brain Research 2003, 16: 145-161. (PDF in Institute eLibrary)

            Gross Electrophysiology (Event-related potentials)

            iv. Maess B, et al. Musical syntax is processed in Broca's area: An MEG study. Nature Neuroscience 2001; 4: 540-545 (PDF in Institute eLibrary)

           v. Poulin-Chardonnat B, et al. Processing of musical syntax tonic versuss ubdominant: An event-related potential study. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 200518:1545-1554. (PDF will be emailed)

 

2.  Rossing et al, Science of Sound 3rd Ed, 2002, Chapter 5, "Hearing"

 

Problem Set

1. Rossing Chapter 5, Review Questions #4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 16, 19; Questions for Thought & Discussion #2; Exercises #1,3

 

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Homework Due Nov. 12

Except Study Section E

 

Reading

1. Seminar: Creativity in Music: Functional Neuroanatomy & Psychopathology

          

2.  Rossing et al, Science of Sound 3rd Ed, 2002, Chapter 6, "Loudness"

 

Problem Set

1. Rossing Chapter 6, Review Questions #1, 3, 4, 13, 15, 17; Exercises #1, 3

Text 

 

Homework Due Nov. 19
Except Study Section F

Reading
1. Seminar:
            Rhythm Perception & Production    
2.  Rossing et al, Science of Sound 3rd Ed, 2002, Chapter 15, "Speech Production"

Problem Set
1. Rossing Chapter 15, Review Questions #2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 13, 15; Exercises #2

 

Text 


Homework Due Nov. 26
Except Study Section G

Reading
1. Seminar:
            Emotion & Meaning in Music         
2.  Rossing et al, Science of Sound 3rd Ed, 2002, Chapter 16, "Speech Recognition, Analysis & Synthesis"

Problem Set
1. Rossing Chapter 16, Review Questions #1, 6, 7; Exercises #1

Text 


Homework Due Dec 3
Except Study Section H

Reading
1. Seminar:
            Auditory Development & Musical Capacities
2.Rossing: None

Problem Set
None

Text 

Homework Due Dec 10

Reading
1. Seminar:
            Talent & Intelligence in Music
2.  Rossing et al, Science of Sound 3rd Ed, 2002, Chapter 17, "Singing"

Problem Set
1. Rossing Chapter 17, Review Questions #1, 2, 4, 6-thru-9, 14-thru-20; Exercises #2, 4

 

ALL OUTSTANDING HOMEWORKS for STUDY SECTIONS
Handed in on Dec 10th or Emailed by Jan 12th

END

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